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Nigeria is Technology Giant of Africa - African Leaders

Featured Nigeria is Technology Giant of Africa - African Leaders Credit: dustlessblastingblog.com

Monday, July 8, 2041

 
 
 
The journey of Nigeria’s technological grandeur started in 2023 when a young Nigerian, Musa Jemibewon developed an advanced technology for combustion engines. His discovery is today being used by aircraft manufacturers to build aircrafts that fly with 40% more resistance against turbulence. Ever since Jemibewon’s invention, it has been a boom of technological innovations in every part of the country.
 
It still remains a shock to the world that Nigeria could so swiftly become a world technology giant, given its several years of educational backwardness.
 
The “unexpected support” Jemibewon got from the government and the success of his research soon “opened the eyes” of Nigerians and the governments to the array of innovations in the country. Claims on discoveries started springing up at every nook and cranny of the nation. This led to more financial supports from the FG and the creation of the Science Innovation Derivative Bill (SIDB). Like Oil and Gas Derivative Bill, the SIDB gives state governments right to 18% derivatives of science innovations-related earnings emanating from their states.
 
At first, it was uneconomical for state governments to invest so much in support and search for innovators. But after about 15 years, when science innovations earnings across all industries rose to about 15% of national revenue, having an indigenous innovation became a jackpot for state governors. Now, politicians enthusiastically groom, support and look for innovators in order to get easy funds into their treasury.
 

Just last week Thursday, July 4, 2041, the World Science and Technology Conference held in Isehin, Oyo State - a city now widely referred to as the technology hub of Africa. To the admiration of all, three Nigerian J.S.S 2 students exhibited the product of their sessional project - a 9G-enabled mobile phone, built from scratch by these young Nigerians. At a time when most Nigerians still use 8G+-enabled phones, having these young leaders produce a 9G+ phone was practically unthinkable for many, especially the Nigerian president - who was apparently dumbfounded at the event. 

 

Another high point of the conference was the giving of recognition awards to Africans who have contributed so greatly to the development of science and technology in the world. Among them were Mrs Ngozi Ikenna, founder of the Abakaliki Robotic Institute, Abakaliki, Ebonyi state; Eng Kaku Galambu, founder of KidsTech Corporation in Uganda; Mr Sadiq Aliyu, a physically challenged mechanical engineer who trains homeless kids (popularly called Almajiris) in northern Nigeria for free in automobile making.

 

Currently, all science and technology curriculum of secondary schools and higher institutions are designed with compulsory practical modules. Science teachers and lecturers have, therefore, had to either learn to make their teachings practical or be shown the way out of the system - following the reform exercise of the education sector in 2025 that saw over 42,000 teachers and lecturers retrenched.

 

Consequently, the governments of China and the US now look up to Nigeria in areas of biotechnology and organic medicine - which are critical in their health care systems.

 

From the advance combustion engine innovation, to the discovery of permanent cure for HIV/AIDs http://goo.gl/jlFqBD , to the discovery of cure by a teenager for Vitiligo http://goo.gl/cKkQ46 , to the development of a photovoltaic system with 80% efficiency http://goo.gl/A4QKYf , to mass automobile production http://bit.ly/1HQVw4R , among others, Nigeria continues to lead and support other African countries in science and technology. Of note is the support Nigeria enjoys from other African nations who "see this stride as a thing of pride and not of strife for Africa,” - according to the president of Uganda.

 

 

 

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